Deecam D200 720P IP Camera Review

Product by:
Deecam

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On July 9, 2015
Last modified:July 9, 2015

Summary:

IP cameras used to be a pain to configure, but the easy app for this camera makes setup a breeze by simply scanning a QR code. Picture quality, including night vision, is very sharp in high definition.

If you like being able to check your home while you’re away, the full pan and tilt controls on this Deecam D200 IP Camera will help you look around your home, even when you’re not there.

PROs

  • HD recording: The picture and video quality on this camera is very good (see the attached video sample of the camera switching to night mode). The 720P resolution picks up a lot of detail and makes it easy to see what’s going on in your house while you’re away.
  • Night vision: The IR lights make it possible to “see in the dark” in black and white when there is no other light in the room. Please note that this will not work through glass, so you can’t aim this through a window to record outside at night. I’ve attached a sample video to this review that demonstrates the night mode kicking in when I turn the light off.
  • Motion detection: You can place a Micro SD card into this camera and it will locally record video whenever motion is detected. You can also have the camera email you when it detects motion.
  • Pan and tilt controls: Using the app for this camera, you can control the pan and tilt controls to view an entire room or check out different areas of your back yard, for example. You can also set preset locations so that the camera automatically moves to a certain position.
  • Compatibility: Early IP cameras required odd Active X controls, which meant you had to use Internet Explorer to setup the camera. This camera’s web interface is much more compatible, working with Safari and Chrome on the Mac.
  • Setup: There are basically two ways to setup this camera.
    • The Easy Way: Download the “Life Online” app and use it to scan the QR code on the bottom of the camera. An online service will automatically help your phone and camera find each other when you’re not at home. This relies on a third-party website to help the two devices to connect.
    • The Hard Way: I like having a little more control, and I was pleased that I can set this camera up the “traditional” way as well, which involves changing the router’s port forwarding settings and setting the camera to a static IP address. For most people though, the “easy way” will suffice


CONs

  • Unencrypted connections: I could not find an HTTPS server on this camera. While this is common for home IP cameras, please be aware that if you’re connected to a public WiFi hotspot, then your password to access the camera can be sent over plain text. To help mitigate this, you can use your phone’s cellular connection.  Also, change your IP camera’s password often (and never make it the same as another password you use).

Overall, this device has a sharp HD camera that performs well in the dark, thanks to the infrared lights. This Deecam IP camera is great for monitoring your home when you’re away.

Check out the Deecam D200 1280x720P HD H.264 Wireless/Wired IP Camera on Amazon

— Sample provided for review

2 Comments
  1. Reply
    Matthew Adams July 19, 2015 at 8:36 am

    How do you go about viewing the feed from the camera if you opt for the static IP/port forwarding route? I’m specifically wondering about viewing on an Android device. Is it a matter of going to http://myhomeipaddress:cameraport in a browser, or is there an app you know of that can handle this? Also, if you’re interested in further securing it, you can set up a reverse proxy to encrypt your traffic, as discussed at StackExchange here: https://security.stackexchange.com/questions/56779/securing-remotely-accessible-ip-cameras-that-do-not-support-https.

    • Reply
      Ryan July 20, 2015 at 10:47 am

      Hi Matthew,
      You got it right: you would use your home IP address followed by the port number you set up to forward in your router. For example, if your home IP address is 8.8.4.4 and you set up port 1234 to forward, you could access the camera with http://8.8.4.4:1234. If your home IP address changes often, you can setup a dynamic domain name system at http://www.noip.com, which many routers can be configured to automatically update. I mainly use “LiveCams Pro” on iOS, but I’ve had luck with “tinyCam” on Android in the past. Many apps will ask for your external IP address and port number separately, in which case you wouldn’t need to combine it into one URL like above. I hope this helps!
      And thanks for the link about encrypting the traffic!

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